Tuesday, November 19, 2013

I’ve been thinking a lot about tubal ligation recently.  It’s something I’ve thought of in the past but more as a fleeting thing.  I don’t know.  Here’s the thing, I don’t want to have children.  I have no interest.  I would love to be an auntie but being a parent isn’t something I want.  I never really have.  When I did think about having children, they were always adopted or foster kids.  I do sometimes think of fostering older kids one day because I know the system is harder the longer you’re in it.  But that has more to do with helping someone  than it does having children of my own.

I believe I can get it covered if I have a doctor’s support.  I see my psychiatrist in a few weeks and am going to run it by her.  I think that with my psych issues, my parent’s psych issues, my health problems, my inability to even take care of myself much less anyone else…  I’d say I’m a pretty good candidate for the ol’ snip snip.

But then I think, because of my PCOS, I have to take birth control pills anyway.  So would surgery be pointless?  Or would it be a way really make sure I don’t get knocked up?  I’m going to bring it up and see what she thinks about it.  I honestly cannot imagine her not supporting it.

Have any of you had tubal ligation?  I’m curious about the procedure and how it effected you.  If you don’t mind sharing, of course.

8 comments:

  1. Hi, dollface. I also considered tubal ligation for the same reasons as you. I need to talk to my doctor about it, because one of the reported aftereffects is worsened PMDD. I have a terrible case of PMDD already, so I need to research it more to see if this is common. Good luck with whatever you decide, dear.

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    1. I'm lucky that I don't get PMS or much cramping. I had horrific periods but having uterine cysts put a stop to that, thank GOD. Also being on the pill helps. Oh god, I already dread the idea of PMDD or anything even remotely. I'll have to do some more research too!

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  2. Heidi, two weeks ago, I had essure implants done at the same time as an endometrial ablation, hysteroscope, biopsy, and removal of my IUD. I had general anesthesia because they were doing so much, but I think the essure by itself can be done in a doctor's office. There's no general anesthesia, and no incisions. I had a lot of pain for about 4 days afterward, but I don't know if it was caused by any one procedure. I've had only minor cramping since then, off & on. (*Important note - I had all of that done due to EXTREME pain issues. And I'm not sure if the cramping is due to the essure, or any one of the other things I had done, or if I am still having the same problems that led to surgery, and I really need a hysterectomy.)

    But seriously - look into essure. It's easier than ligation, and more foolproof than birth control pills.

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    1. I'm definitely DEFINITELY going to look into that! And talk to my gynecologist about the different options. Something non-surgical would be so great. Thank you so much for the information!! <3

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  3. I know this isn't what you asked, but here are my thoughts.

    You might be better off taking metformin *instead* of birth control pills for your PCOS, as the hormone imbalance is very often caused by insulin resistance. Even if you are not diabetic (I don't know if you are or not), I'd be surprised if insulin resistance were not at work with you particularly.

    I used to have PCOS to the point where I was clearly infertile. I didn't ovulate -- my periods happened because the uterine lining had built up so much (over months) that it just got too heavy and couldn't support itself. Then I'd bleed for weeks. This was barely managed even with birth control pills. During the period I was on BCP, I gained a tremendous amount of weight -- nearly 200 pounds. I will never accept that the pills had nothing to do with it. (There were also plenty of other side effects from the pill, the sort you'd expect. Lots of headaches, acne, etc.) When I asked to be put on metformin instead, my cycles regulated and I started ovulating. My cycles have been *normal* since.

    Back to you: Metformin may treat your PCOS at the root cause, without the tremendous potential for side effects from BCP. Plus it's cheaper!

    I have no personals on the tubal ligation, though. I'd always thought I might like an endometrial ablation -- double benefit of lessening my periods and decent chance of eliminating fertility (now that I ovulate).

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    1. Oh my god, uterine sister!! I didn't have a period until I was in my mid-20s and I ended up bleeding heavily for a year before I went to see a gynecologist. I was just so scared because of my weight. It was so heavy that I had to bring towels to work to sit on. But FINALLY I had to go and ended up having uterine cysts that needed to be surgically removed and that stopped the never ending blood. But, yes, it had built up for soooooo many years that it all finally...fell.

      I actually am on metformin as well! I actually have normal monthly periods now that I'm on birth control. I think the combo works well; my periods are fairly light (a miracle compared to the year of period hell) and I don't have much cramping.

      I've MAJORLY lucked out. Aside from regulation, I do have sex so that's part of why I'm on birth control. I mean, I always use condoms but I like having two forms, just in case!

      I'm def going to look into ligation! And talk to my gynecologist about allll this stuff!

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  4. i heart my tubal ligation!

    i'd planned and schemed for one since i was 13, and finally achieved it in my late 20s

    my only regret is not knowing that abdominal surgery is hella hard to recover from, i only gave myself a week off work and needed 3

    so, with that in mind, it's not a thing i would go around recommending unless there's a lot of financial and at home support on hand, unless all other methods of pregnancy prevention have unlivable side effects

    which, for me, all the chemical methods totally had unlivable side effects

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  5. I had it done 8 years ago at the age of 27. I am now trying to hold out as long as I can before getting a hysterectomy. I had an endometrial ablation two years ago because of heavy cramps and bleeding. Both are now coming back. I'm over it.

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